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Layer 3d#

The Layer 3d is a render scene embedded in an image layer. It is used to render a scene using the raytracer of Clarisse. The Layer 3d is defined by a viewpoint (camera), an instance of Raytracer renderer which defines render settings and a list of lights and scene objects to render.

Note

The Layer 3d is a specialization of the abstract class Layer Scene which render a render scene to an image using the classic rendering engine of Clarisse.

Camera and Renderer#

To set the viewpoint of a layer 3d you must connect a camera by connecting a Camera item to the Camera attribute of the layer. To render a layer 3d, you must connect to an instance of a Raytracer to the Renderer attribute of the layer which defines the render settings of the scene. For more information on renderers please refer to What's a Renderer?.

Rendering Visibility#

By default the layer sees what's in the context of its parent image. Through the Attribute Editor, you can very easily customize the visibility of the layer. For example, you can explicitly set what are the visible geometries, what are the lights of the scene, which geometries are shadow casters, what's seen in reflection/refraction, what's used for global illumination computations and which objects or groups of objects act as holdouts.

Visibility Attributes

Attribute Description
Lights Define which lights are used during rendering. If nothing is specified, it uses the lights defined in the context where the image lives as well as all its sub-contexts.
Visibility Define which geometries (scene objects) are seen by the primary (camera) rays. If nothing is specified, it uses the scene objects defined in the context where the image lives as well as all its sub-contexts.
Shadows Define which geometries (scene objects) are occluding lights when computing shadow rays. If nothing is specified, it uses the scene objects defined in the context where the image lives as well as all its sub-contexts.
Raytracing Define which geometries (scene objects) are visible during raytracing computations (reflection/transmission rays). If nothing is specified, it uses the scene objects defined in the context where the image lives as well as all its sub-contexts.
Global Illumination Define which geometries are visible during global illumination computations. If nothing is specified, it uses the scene objects defined in the context where the image lives as well as all its sub-contexts.
Matte Objects Define which geometries (scene objects) are used as matte (holdouts) in the render.
Matte Color Define the color of the matte objects when specified.
Matte Alpha Define the alpha value of the matte objects when specified.

Each visibility attribute can connect to either a single item or a group. If you drag a selection of items while holding Ctrl, a new group including the selection is automatically created and connected to the attribute.

Lighting#

By default, scene objects referenced by the layer 3d are illuminated by lights that are in image context along with sub-contexts. You can override this behavior by explicitly referencing Lights attribute to any group of lights.

Materials#

You can override all the materials assigned by the scene objects directly in the layer. To override all materials, just connect a material to the Override Material attribute. Alternatively, you can use assign a shading layer to the layer by connecting it to the Shading Layer attribute. For more information please refer to the Shading Layer section.

Important

The material override takes the priority over the shading layer which itself takes priority over the materials defined by the item of the scene.

Near/Far Clipping#

You can clip the render by setting custom near and far planes. By default, clipping is disabled. Clipping can be useful when rendering underwater scenes to simulate the gap between the lens and the water when filming the air/water transition.

AOVs#

It is possible to export AOVs using Light Path Expressions and AOV Stores. For more information about the AOV workflow in Clarisse please refer here.

Deep Image Output#

In a traditional image a single value (typically a color) is stored per pixel. Compositing is then performed using masks and it can be difficult to compose two different images originating from different rendering engines for example.

To solve this issue, Clarisse can also output deep images in which a list of values along with their depth information is stored per pixel. These deep images can be then used in most recent external composing packages and in such way that compositing layers becomes simply a matter of merging images without requiring any special mask or producing any artifacts.

To output a Deep EXR simply activate Enable Deep Output and specify a filename to Save Deep Data As using the same convention as for saving normal images.

Important

Deep EXR are only saved when rendering images using the Render Manager or CNode. The Layer 3d doesn't output Deep AOVs.

Optimizing Deep Image Output Size#

As deep images store a lot more than a single information per pixel than traditional images, deep image file size can become pretty big specially when rendering volumes. In order to reduce output file size, it is possible to limit the number of stored values or even merge values that are contained in deep images.

Attribute Description
Merge Threshold Specify the max Z distance threshold between different values. Removed sample contributions are still taken into account in existing samples.
Max Sample Count Limit the maximum number of samples (values) per pixel. A value of 0 means unlimited.
Deep Output Precision Set OpenEXR buffer precision to 16-bit or 32-bit

An alternative to Deep EXR Output is the Cryptomatte. For more information please refer to Cryptomatte.